The Agreement That Divided South America

to lay down a special condition within the framework of an agreement. The King of Portugal, John II, who was not satisfied with this agreement, negotiated with the Spanish monarchs. At that time, Portugal had more ships and military power, so Spain was a bit at a disadvantage if negotiations failed and led to a struggle. The result of these negotiations was a revised north-south virtual line, 270 leagues west of the original line or 46°30? W of Greenwich. The new line effectively gave Portugal control of what Brazil is now. You will also notice that Brazil is located east of the line and was discovered on April 22, 1500 by the Portuguese explorer Pedro Alvares Cabral. Brazil became a colony of Portugal and then expanded west along the Amazon and south along the coast. Today, Brazil is one of the few countries in South America where Spanish is not the official language. After learning of the trip sponsored by Castile, the Portuguese king sent a threatening letter to the Catholic kings, King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella, in which he declared that, by the Treaty of Alcáçovas signed in 1479 and by the papal bull Æterni regis of 1481, which forgave Portugal all the countries of the south of the Canary Islands, All the countries discovered by Christopher Columbus belonged. indeed, in Portugal. The Portuguese king also said that he had already made arrangements for a fleet (an armada led by Francisco de Almeida) to leave soon and take possession of the new lands. [Citation required] After reading the letter, the Catholic Monarchs knew that they had no military power in the Atlantic capable of competing with the Portuguese, so they pursued a diplomatic outcome.

[Citation required] On May 4, 1493, Pope Alexander VI ordained (Rodrigo Borgia), an Aragonese born from Valencia, in the Bull Inter caetera, that all countries west of a pole-to-pole line 100 leagues west of one of the islands of the Azores or the Cape Verde Islands should belong to Castile, although the territory under Christian rule remains intact from Christmas 1492. [10] The bull did not mention Portugal or its lands, so Portugal could not claim newly discovered lands, even if they were located east of the line. . . .